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20100701
20100731
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)
. a complex u.s.-russia spy swap was underway late today, involving ten russian agents here and four people convicted of espionage in russia. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the action in a new york court today and look at russia's deep-cover spy program. >> lehrer: then, we talk to white house chief of staff, rahm emanuel. >> woodruff: tom bearden reports from the gulf of mexico, where scientists are turning to tiny microbes to help clean up oiled marshland. >> lehrer: margaret warner examines the pentagon's new rules for dealing with the news media. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown has a conversation with jean- michel cousteau about his famous father-- ocean explorer jacques cousteau. >> when people ask what do you expect to find? he would always say if i knew, i wouldn't go. so it was the sense of discovery which is, obviously, related it to adventure. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland
's u.s. ambassador about the airliner crash that killed 152 people, and she examines u.s./pakistani relations after the leak of thousands of secret military documents. >> ifill: we ask environmental engineer nancy kinner to track what's happened to the oil in the water. 100 days after the gulf disaster. >> lehrer: and spencer michels tells the story of a one-man mission to help clean up the oil in louisiana. >> a private individual has taken it upon himself to try to protect the barrier islands in the gulf of mexico. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that zero emission technologies to breathing a little easier, while taking 4.6 million truckloads off the road every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
. president obama led a chorus of concern over the huge disclosure of classified u.s. military documents about the war in afghanistan. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, two takes on the document dump. first, senators jack reed and kit bond assess what it could mean for the war effort. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to david leigh of the "guardian" and media watcher alex jones on the journalism impact. >> ifill: holly pattenden of "business monitor international" in london looks at the corporate shake-up at b.p. >> lehrer: tom bearden reports from the alabama gulf coast on kenneth feinberg and the complicated mission of compensation. >> and the lead is still tied up they still compensation hasn't been forth coming. >> when i was a young person working in these places, didn't see a way out. and i certainly didn't think the way out would be this. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corpor
this summer. >> lehrer: margaret warner talks to global post reporter jean mckinsey about u.s. efforts to build up local security forces in afghanistan. >> ifill: and geoffrey brown talks to artist chuck close and his biographer christopher finch about art and overcoming adversity. >> i have a great deal of difficulty recognizing faces. especially if i happen to... if i've just met somebody, it's hopeless. >> brown: you are known for portrays of faces. >> i was driven to make them. i'm absolutely positive. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> lehrer: the stock market rallied for the first time in more than a week. the dow jones industrial average was up more than 170 points before dou
more u.s. soldiers were killed in afghanistan in the last 24 hours, bringing the total to 66 for july-- the most in a single month since the war began. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, ray suarez talks to two veterans of the iraq and afghanistan conflicts about the continued challenge from deadly roadside bombs or i.e.d.s-- the number one killer of americans. >> lehrer: we explore the latest mix of economic numbers and the prospects for the auto industry with business reporter micki maynard and economist martin bailey. >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus, sitting in for mark shields, present their analysis of the week's news. ♪ >> lehrer: and sting with strings. jeffrey brown talks to rock star sting about his newest musical challenge-- performing with a 45 piece orchestra. >> the royal if i ma mar:-- philharmonic is a serious orchestra. so in a way it does flatter my ego but also i have to step up to the plate and... and you know, so it's a big challenge for me. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newsho
's been a deadly 24 hours for u.s. forces in afghanistan. eight americans were killed in separate attacks. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, this month's u.s. death toll stands at 33 so far on track to top last month's record of 60. we have the latest on the violence, the dangers and the difficulties on the frontlines. >> lehrer: then, we assess the risks and benefits of the diabetes drug, avandia. >> ifill: we have another report from haiti-- six months after the earthquake. tonight, ray suarez looks at the road ahead for the many amputees. >> thousands of haitians lost limbs in january's earthquake. international charities are bringing pros thesees, mobility and hope. >> lehrer: and margaret warner updates the charges against six new orleans police officers in the killing and cover-up of unarmed citizens after hurricane katrina. >> what appears to me is that the officers based upon the admitted statements immediately decided to not tell the truth. that's just disgusting. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has be
,249. a batch of new numbers raised more questions today about where the u.s. economy is headed. the latest data on jobs, housing and manufacturing underscored concerns that the recovery may be losing steam at the year's midpoint. in manufacturing, the federal reserve reported factory output fell last month after three months of growth. at the same time, new claims for jobless benefits fell to the lowest in nearly two years. but it was mostly due to seasonal factors. meanwhile, the private firm realtytrac reported 528,000 home foreclosures in the first six months of 2010. the company warned that lenders could repossess more than one million homes by year's end, a new record. at that rate, it could take until 2013 to work through the backlog of repossessed properties. president obama focused on the broad economic picture, as he spoke at the ground breaking of a new factory in holland, michigan. >> the progress we've made so far is not nearly enough to do - - undo the enormous damage that this recession caused. as i've said since the first day i took office, it's going to take time to reverse the
for another month. those russians accused of spying in the u.s. may be heading home in a prisoner swap. it was widely reported today that an exchange is in the works. five of the russian suspects were being moved from virginia and boston, to new york. the other five suspects are already there. they could be traded for several people convicted in russia of passing secrets to the u.s. more than 50 iraqis were killed in attacks across baghdad today. 32 of them died in a suicide bombing. the victims were shi-ite pilgrims crossing a bridge to a shrine to commemorate a shi-ite saint. the attack came despite tight security. the u.s. toll in afghanistan rose again today as three more troops died in a roadside bombing in the south. that made 10 americans killed so far in july. also today, an airstrike mistakenly killed five afghan soldiers in the east. the afghan ministry of defense-- m.o.d.-- complained, and the international security assistance force-- i-saf--said a joint investigation was underway. >> ( translated ): we have started investigating the incident since this morning, we also con
documents detailing five years of u.s. war efforts in afghanistan. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, authors steve coll and phil smucker assess what the secret material says about the conduct of the war. >> woodruff: phil shenon of the "daily beast" updates us on what is wikileaks and who is behind it. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro reports on the first sentence handed down by a war crimes tribunal to a member of cambodia's "killing fields" regime. >> woodruff: john merrow wraps up his series about the top to bottom efforts by a school superintendent to reform the new orleans public education system after hurricane katrina. >> making promises, talking publicly about all the big changes he's going to make in the schools. well, it's been three years, time for paul vallas's report card. >> brown: and we look at the impact of the americans with disabilities act on this, the 20th anniversary of the law. >> he didn't come because politicians thought it was a good idea. it came because people with disabilities fought and said we're going to be equal. we're going to
deepwater oil exploration. >> as the u.s. fights to pacify the b.p. gusher in the gulf, the p51-- owned by brazils national p51-- owned by brazil's national oil company, petrobras-- is pumping 24/7 from similar depths below the sea. its the newest platform in >> brown: paul solman talks to greek prime minister george papandreou about the violence in the streets and the turmoil on the financial markets, as greece falls further into debt. >> woodruff: and, we close with a profile of the next poet laureate of the u.s., w.s. merwin. >> as soon as i could move a stub of pencil and put words on paper, i wanted to be a moat. i mean, i was fascinated by the poems my mother had read to me and by the hymns that we sang in church. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corp
. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. trade deficit hit an 18-month peak in may. the commerce department reported the trade gap widened nearly 5% to $42.3 billion. imports and exports were up, but the import surge indicated consumers could spend more down the road. that news, combined with good second quarter earnings reports, translated on wall street. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 146 points to close at 10,363. the nasdaq rose 43 points to close at 2,242. b.p. prepared to begin gradual tests of its new, tighter containment cap on the blown-out oil well at the bottom of the gulf of mexico. for the first time in months, news about the efforts to contain the spill struck a positive note. >> it's been a very consequential 24 hours in the lifecycle of this response. >> sreenivasan: the freshly installed cap maneuvered into place monday evening. remote-controlled robotic arms slowly placed it over the gushing well, a mile below the gulf's surface. retired coast guard admiral thad allen is in charge of the government response. >> i think we are very confident we can take control of this hydr
of reverse racism at the u.s. department of agriculture, as with newshour political editor david chalian, the administration apologizes to a fired employee. >> lehrer: plus, a tom bearden oil spill report on the dispute over how to block the flow of oil into threatened tidal estuaries in louisiana. >> woodruff: and, on this 60th anniversary of north korea's attack on the south, jeffrey brown revisits that first hot conflict of the cold war, and explores its continuing legacy with warren wiedhahn, a u.s. marine veteran of the war, plus historians michael beschloss and alex roland. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the campaign to toughen financi
government debt or trying to spark new lending to business. for a closer look, greg ip, u.s. economics editor of "the economist" magazine. greg, welcome. corporate earnings, they were higher than expected. what happened? why? >> well, the story of the last few months is that corporations have actually been reporting earnings that are better than analysts have expected but often the market has not taken that well. because when you dig down you find that a lot of that improvement is because of cost-cutting. we know that employment has been weak. and one reason why is that companies, when they meet their sales targets are doing it by making their workers more productive rather than hiring more. the other thing especially true today with companies like caterpillar and ups is the strong sales are not in the u.s. you but if places like china and india. the bottom line is the market is doing well but that is not necessarily a great sign for the economy. over the last month, even though we had a good day today t only kind of like takes us back to where we were, you know, a few weeks ago. it's basical
sreenivasan in our news room. >> 3 u.s. troops and a british soldier were killed by roadside booms in afghanistan today t that made a dozen international troops to die in the first five days of july. meanwhile, leading u.s. senators warned americans just expect more such days. republican john mccain spoke in kabul. >> there are obviously obstacles that lie ahead. there will be more difficulty times in the short-term. casualties will go up. but i'm convinced we can succeed and will succeed in khandahar is obviously the key area and if we succeed there, we will succeed in the rest of this struggle. >> reporter: khandahar is a taliban stronghold. the planned offensive to seize the city has been delayed. the democratic republic of congo began two days of mourning today for at least 242 people killed in a tanker truck explosion on friday. more than 200 others were hurt. the truck tipped over near a site where people had gathered to watch the world cup soccer matches. dozens ran toward the truck and began scooping up fuel before the explosion. some 61 women and 36 children were among the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)